Shea's Bookshelf

The Secret Keeper of Jaipur by Alka Joshi

The Secret Keeper of Jaipur by Alka Joshi
You know me, I’m a ‘find my way into a random, used bookstore and accidentally spend $300 on books’ kind of woman. I’m a ‘just one more chapter at midnight’ kind of woman. My best spent day is on the couch reading a book cover to cover. But there are a few authors where I will buy all of their works and Alka Joshi is now one of them. The Secret Keeper of Jaipur follows Malik, now a young adult in his young twenties…and uses her story-telling prowess to intensify the drama with everything from a collapsing building to gold-smuggling sheep…

The Devil and the Dark Water by Stuart Turton

The Devil and the Dark Water by Stuart Turton
The year is 1634. The stage is the Saardam, a ship sailing on the Indian Ocean, leaving Batavia (or what is now Jakarta, Indonesia) and heading for Amsterdam, Netherlands. The cast is a literal motley crew of dignitaries, officers, and crew members who not only have to handle the seas but are also faced with transporting a prisoner and two mysterious pieces of cargo. And that was before the devil presented itself…

Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk

Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk
The first rule of Fight Club is that you don’t talk about Fight Club. The second rule of Fight Club is that you don’t talk about Fight Club…

The Ice Princess by Camilla Läckberg

The Ice Princess by Camilla Läckberg
From the first page, Läckberg isolates you in this tiny, frozen town, swirling you into the mystery of why Alex, the bright light of Fjällbacka, would kill herself. The Ice Princess by Camilla Läckberg is a Detective Mystery Novel. It is the first novel in her Erica Falck and Patrik Hedström 10-book series, set in her hometown of Fjällbacka…

Every Word is a Bird We Teach to Sing by Daniel Tammet

Every Word is a Bird We Teach to Sing by Daniel Tammet
I love reading. I will stumble upon the used bookstore in whatever town I’m in. My body is covered in tattoos based on books. I delight in the act of reading and the intrigue of the plot as much as I enjoy the craft of the author in telling his story. In Daniel Tammet’s Every Word is a Bird We Teach to Sing, I seem to have found a bibliophile and logophile in similar reverence…

The Big Sleep by Raymond Chandler

The Big Sleep by Raymond Chandler
The Big Sleep by Raymond Chandler is a Detective Mystery Novel…Chandler’s writing style feels like the 1930s and gives you images of black and white noir films. This story seems to have a simple plot—detective gets hired to stop his client from being black-mailed—that resolves in the middle of the story. But suddenly you’re confronted with a labyrinth of Daedalus proportions…

Fantastic Mr. Fox by Roald Dahl

Fantastic Mr. Fox by Roald Dahl
Fantastic Mr. Fox by Roald Dahl was one of my favorite books as a kid, and though I'm not one to reread books, I've read this one dozens of times. First, you've got an author who is the master of craft. He feels like just another kid and so you want to listen to what he's got to say. He uses language that is familiar to us, doesn't demean us, but rather like he's inviting us in on his adventures. Second…

The Song of Achilles by Madeline Miller

The Song of Achilles by Madeline Miller
We all know the story of Achilles. But who was Achilles before he became the savior of the Greeks? How did his parents love him? What were his favorite pastimes as a child? Whom did he love? In The Song of Achilles, Madeline Miller gives us the love story we didn’t know we were craving. With her incredible knowledge of both The Illiad and Greek mythology…

The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas
In The Hate U Give, Starr Carter is handing you a white package with a red bow. She has the kind of voice that makes you want to let down your guard and listen. She explains things in a way that opens up your eyes to see…Let her guide you towards understanding that the stories we’re brought up with, the stories we’re told at bedtime, the stories that get told around the dinner table are not the only stories that exist…

The Poet X by Elizabeth Acevedo

The Poet X by Elizabeth Acevedo
Poet X is a work of fiction told entirely through verse. The poet is Xiomara, or “X” as her friends call her, and her voice rises from the story like she’s speaking directly to you. She’s got something to say, and regardless if you are a twenty-something white girl or a fifty-something black man or another fifteen-year-old Dominican, you will understand…

And Justice There is None by Deborah Crombie

And Justice There is None by Deborah Crombie
And Justice There is None by Deborah Crombie is the 8th book in an 18-book series (with more on the way) in the Duncan Kincaid/Gemma James mystery series. If you’re more of a traditionalist, you can start with the first book in the series, A Share in Death. Otherwise, Crombie drops you into the story and you’re none the wiser. Regardless, you will get that intriguing mystery you’re craving…

Guesthouse for Ganesha by Judith Teitelman

Guesthouse for Ganesha by Judith Teitelman
Guesthouse for Ganesha by Judith Teitelman is a story of Judaism, Hinduism, survivalism, and love. It is Mary Poppin’s spoonful of sugar, and it is the pinprick of fear that burrows into the marrow of your bones, starting at the tips of your toes and spreading, rushing, encapsulating your very essence until you are left wondering what room is left to feel anything else…